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Research Team

The Equality Project is a collective endeavour. The team includes three faculty researchers: Marguerite Deslauriers, Principle Investigator and a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at McGill, Andrew Piper (collaborator), a Professor in McGill’s Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, and Laura Prelipcean (collaborator), Affiliate Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics, Modern Languages and Linguistics at Concordia University. The student Research Assistants, both graduate and undergraduate, are drawn from a variety of disciplines (philosophy, languages and literature, education, and law). They contribute a wide range of skills in languages, in literature, in philosophy and its history, in the administration of the Project, and in the techniques of the digital humanities. Assistants are divided into subgroups according to these skills: the French section, the Italian section, and the Digital section. Graduate students are also responsible for the supervision of the undergraduate assistants, and all RAs are implicated in the research of the Project.

Marguerite Deslauriers

Marguerite Deslauriers

Marguerite Deslauriers is Professor of Philosophy at McGill University. She is the author of Aristotle on Definition (2007) and co-editor of the Cambridge Companion to Aristotle’s Politics (2013). Her published work includes articles on ancient and early modern philosophy, most recently with a focus on Italian Renaissance dialogues and polemical treatises arguing for the superiority of women over men. She is interested in the history of philosophical conceptions of sexual difference, the history of feminism, and the works of Aristotle.

Andrew Piper

Andrew Piper

Andrew Piper is Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at McGill University. His work explores the application of computational approaches to the study of literature and culture with a particular emphasis on network theory and questions of transtextuality. He is the director of .txtLAB,  a digital humanities laboratory at McGill, and the leader of the multinational partnership grant, “NovelTM: Text Mining the Novel,” which brings together 21 partners across North America and Europe to undertake the first large-scale quantitative and cross-cultural study of the novel. His most recent publications include Book Was There: Reading in Electronic Times (Chicago 2012) as well as Dreaming in Books: The Making of the Bibliographic Imagination in the Romantic Age (Chicago 2009), which was awarded the MLA Prize for a First Book and honourable mention for the Harry Levin Prize for the American Comparative Literature Association.

Laura Prelipcean

Laura Prelipcean

Laura Prelipcean is an Affiliate Assistant Professor at Concordia University. She completed her PhD in Italian Studies at the University of Toronto with a thesis on Lodovico Domenichi’s La nobiltà delle donne. Her research appeared in various scholarly journals, including Renaissance and Reformation, Quaderni d’italianistica, Confraternitas, and Studi rinascimentali. She has won several teaching awards, such as the Clarke Thomson Award for Excellence in Sessional Teaching (Brock University), the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance Teaching Excellence Award, the Course Instructor Award in Italian (University of Toronto), and the Teaching Assistants’ Training Program’s Teaching Excellence Award (University of Toronto). Her areas of interest are early modern literature and culture, literary defences of women, women’s epistolary writing, language acquisition, and technology enhanced learning.

 

Mathieu Baril

Mathieu Baril

Mathieu Baril is a PhD student in the department of philosophy at McGill University. He is interested in moral psychology, and especially the concepts of autonomy and freedom. His current work on the team includes mostly transcription and translation.

Sarah Clairmont

Sarah Clairmont

Sarah Clairmont is a PhD student in philosophy at McGill University. Her research interests include feminist philosophy and history of philosophy. Her work on the Project involves research, translation, and maintaining the project website.

Kosta Gligorijevic

Kosta Gligorijevic

Kosta Gligorijevic is a PhD student in philosophy at McGill University. His main research interest is ancient political philosophy, and especially the intersection between Aristotle’s politics, metaphysics and biology. Kosta is a member of the Project’s digital humanities section and works on the reception and transmission of Plato and Aristotle in Renaissance and Early Modern texts on gender. He is also responsible for the transcription, modernization, and digital analysis of the Project’s 16th century English-language treatises, including the work of John Knox, Thomas Elyot, and William Bercher.

Lara Harwood-Ventura

Lara Harwood-Ventura

Lara Harwood-Ventura is a PhD student in Italian Studies in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at McGill University. Her research interests include early modern intellectual history and philosophy, Renaissance Italian literature and theatre, gender studies, and performance studies. Her work on the team has included the transcription and translation of early modern Italian treatises, research on publication history and the biography of Lucrezia Marinella, and organising a conference panel presenting research related to the Project.
Tanya Ludovico

Tanya Ludovico

Tanya Ludovico is a B. Ed. student in the department of Education at McGill University. She has a B.A. in Italian Studies from Concordia University. Her interests lie in Greek and Roman history, languages, and children’s education. Her current work on the team includes transcribing and correcting 16th century Italian texts.

Cassandra Marsillo

Cassandra Marsillo

Cassandra Marsillo is an undergraduate student in the Honours Public History program at Concordia University. She also has a BFA in Studio Arts with a minor in Italian. Her historical research interests include oral history, the study of the formation of nationalist narratives, memory, and the role of mapping and the imaginary in history. She is drawn to historical work that is interactive and accessible to the public. Her current work on the team centres on Lodovico Domenichi’s La nobiltà delle Donne.

Martina Orlandi

Martina Orlandi

 

Martina Orlandi is a PhD student in the department of Philosophy at McGill University. Her research interests are in analytic philosophy, particularly moral psychology and epistemology. Her current work on the Project involves transcription and translation of texts.
Lara Harwood-Ventura

Marco Piana

Marco Piana is a PhD student in Italian Studies at McGill University, department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures. His field of research focuses on the literary representation of otherness and religious identity in early modern Italy, with special regard to Gianfrancesco Pico della Mirandola and the Italian Neoplatonic revival.

Yanicka Poirier

Yanicka Poirier

Yanicka Poirier is a recent philosophy graduate who is now pursuing a B.C.L/L.L.B in the Faculty of Law at McGill University. She is primarily interested in political philosophy and issues related to public reason, liberalism, and queer and religious rights. Her work on the Project centres on administration and transcription.
Charlotte Sabourin

Charlotte Sabourin

Charlotte Sabourin is a PhD student in philosophy  at McGill University. Her research interests include: Kant’s theoretical and practical philosophy, early modern philosophy, and the history of feminist philosophy. Her work on the Project includes research, transcription, and organizational work for the Genre & Method conference (November 2016).